Personal Bankruptcy Affecting Your Life? Try These Tips

When you are thinking about filing bankruptcy, there are a lot of things you need to consider. Bankruptcy laws have changes a few times in the past few years, so it can be hard to know what to expect. Here are some helpful tips so that you have a better idea of how to deal with bankruptcy.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you need to go over your finances and do your best to come up with a manageable budget. You want to do this so that you will not end up so deep in debt again that you will have to file for bankruptcy, again.

Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don’t realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.

If you know people who have filed for bankruptcy, ask them who they would recommend rather than relying on Internet reviews or worse, just randomly picking someone out of the phone book. Although you may find a good lawyer through an advertisement, you can simply find a much better lawyer if the lawyer is recommended to you by someone who has gone through the process and who has the inside track on the lawyer’s true capabilities.

Decide whether you want to file for Chapter 7, or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. As an individual, you may do either one. Find out as much as you can about each type of bankruptcy, so you are able to make a choice that you can live with in the future.

Do some research. There are two main types of personal bankruptcy – Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 will eliminate the majority of your debt while Chapter 13 restructures it to give you time to pay it off. Each one has different rules on what assets you are allowed to keep. So, ask a lot of questions before you decide which one is the best fit for your situation.

You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from “bankrupt” to “debtor” so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, be certain not to transfer any of your belongings or valuables to another person. This includes taking your name off of joint bank accounts or other financial assets. The court will be looking for anything of value in order to repay creditors, and you will be asked under oath whether you have left anything out. If you do not tell the truth, you may be charged with perjury and could possibly spend time in jail. Remember, honesty is the best policy.

There are a lot of things to know if you want to file for bankruptcy, especially if you are not a lawyer and don’t know all of the bankruptcy laws. Use the tips in this article to keep you on the right path. Find out as much as you can, so you can start to improve your finances soon.